Homemade Green Electrolyte Energy Drink

It became my routine to make homemade electrolyte drinks weekly on Sunday, my food prep day. Four litres (2 x 2qt mason jars) of electrolyte green tea drink lasts me enough for a week. A homemade electrolyte drink is a great alternative to gatorade or commercial electrolyte drinks for reduced calories and dollar amounts. Also, it feels better knowing where all my foods are coming from.

Basically, electrolyte drink mix contains some essential nutrients that get lost in sweat, especially sodium and potassium.  This is my electrolyte recipe for when I go running.

Sweet Roast Green Tea

Most of the recipes contain green tea and here is easy brewing method. Scoop 2 tbsp of Sweet Roast Green Tea into infuser and pour 2L of hot water. Steep 2-5 min. I use 2qt mason jar for ease of use, and a stainless infuser.

  • Water – 2L
  • Sweet Roast Green Tea – 2 tbsp dry leaf

Simple Green Tea Electrolyte

Molasses is a byproduct of sugar production. It is basically sugar cane concentrate with most of the simple sugars removed. It is particualrly high in potassium (293mg potassium in one tablespoon), magnesium, iron, copper, manganese and various other minerals. (See nutritional data at healthaliciousness.com) Although it has a slightly bitter taste and many people dislike the taste, I find it quite refreshing when mixed with green tea. If the taste of molasses is too much, you can substitute with turbinado sugar (or raw sugar) or brown sugar which is processed white sugar mixed with molasses.

  • Sweet roast green tea – 2L
  • Lemon juice – 1 whole lemon, juiced (1/2 cup)
  • Salt – 1/2 tsp
  • Molasses – 8 tbsp

Brew Sweet Roast Green Tea in 2L of hot water for 2-5 min. While the tea is hot, add sweetener and salt. Stir well and chill. Once cooled, add lemon juice and mix well.

Ginger-Orange Green Tea

Ginger and Turmeric: Both ginger and turmeric are known for anti-inflammatory properties and reduce inflammation on hard worked muscles. Ginger also stimulates blood circulation. I like to extract juice out of ginger and turmeric with my juicer. If you don’t have a juicer, you can also grate the ginger or slice them thin and boil. Wild yeast in ginger occasionally ferments sugar. Boiling ginger preserves the drink better and helps reduce sharp bite and raw taste.

  • Sweet roast green tea – 2L
  • Ginger – 1 inch section or 1/2 cup
  • Turmeric – 1/8 inch section or 1 tbsp (optional)
  • Orange juice – 1 whole juiced or 1 cup juice
  • Salt – 1/2 tsp
  • Sugar (Turbinado sugar, molasses, or brown sugar)- 8 tbsp

While Sweet Roast Green Tea is hot, add ginger, turmeric, salt and sugar. Stir well untill the sugar is completely dissolved. Chill the green tea mixture. Once it cools down to room temperature, add orange juice.

Ginger-Lilikoi Green Tea

Lilikoi is high in potassium, vitamin C and vitamin A. Getting lilikoi juice is a bit of tedium. Separating seeds and pulp out of juice takes some work. Here is how. Cut lilikoi in half and scoop pulp, juice and seed clump out into a blender. Once you cut and scoop enough lilikoi, blend in quick short intervals to separate seeds and pulp from juice. It takes less than a minute. Strain the juice through cheesecloth or a jelly bag to squeeze the juice out. There you have it, lilikoi juice. You can also freeze lilikoi juice for future use.

  • Sweet roast green tea – 2 L
  • Ginger – 1 inch section or 1/2 cup
  • Turmeric – 1/8 inch section or 1 tbsp (optional)
  • Lilikoi juice – 10 whole juiced or 1 cup juice
  • Salt – 1/2 tsp
  • Sugar (Turbinado sugar, molasses, or brown sugar)- 8 tbsp

Mix ginger, turmeric, salt and sugar into green tea while hot. Cool the green tea mixture. Once cooled, add lilikoi juice to your liking.

One Comment

  1. Troy
    Posted February 29, 2016 at 11:54 am | Permalink

    I tried out the Green Tea Electrolyte this weekend – it was fantastic. Tasted great and kept the cramps at bay on a warm, muggy day. I didn’t know that molasses was relatively high in potassium but yes indeed it is. This is a game-changer!

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